Parenting OEs, 2Es and Everything in Between

What is a Blog Hop?

A Blog Hop is a way to discover and follow blogs, as well as share your own. Every month or two, we pose a topic, our blogging members discuss it, and we link to their posts. GHF blog hops include bloggers from around the world, all of them committed to articulating the unique concerns, needs, and perspectives of gifted/2e families, especially (but not exclusively) those who choose non-traditional education for their kids.

Read on to see what these awesome bloggers have to say about parenting outlier kids!

hopCaitlinFeeling Lighter ~ My Little Poppies (Cait Curley)

Everything is feeling lighter to me lately: parenting, homeschooling, even the holiday chaos. When I think back to this time last year, everything was just...well... heavier; life felt more challenging and stressful. What changed? In some respects, everything has changed.

 

hopCeliGifted Children: Just Pulling the Wool Over Your Eyes ~ Raising Tall Poppies (Celi Trepanier)

With us sitting in the old, middle school desks and this teacher sitting in her chair facing us from in front of the class, she cocked back a bit with her arms folded across her chest and smugly announced with a truckload of retaliatory confidence and self-righteous pride, “oh, he is just pulling the wool over your eyes!”

 

hopCarolynFHawaiian Punch, Junk Food, and a (Holiday) Food Plan ~ A 2E Fox Revived (Carolyn Fox)

You need a (holiday) food plan to tackle the candy canes and eggnog. The sheer volume of sugary stuff and food dyes/additives/flavorings is a nightmare for many 2e parents/kids, imho, which is magnified 10x or more during the holidays.

 

I love Christmas BUT... ~ Sprite's Site (Jo Freitag)
I suppose I should have predicted this happening in the build up to the holiday season; as it is a situation we have met before...

 

Major Themes Related to My Research on Gifted/2E Kids and Bullying ~ RedWhiteandGrew (Pamela Price)
Many children may, when stressed, feel their overexcitabilties "fire up" in response. This can impede the logical, systemic calming down required for someone to address bullying by herself and gain a lasting, powerful sense of self-efficacy in the face of conflict. We need, as parents and educators, to work to help kids manage these OEs before a negative personal encounter. In short, we owe it to them to help develop their social skills in preparation for a negative encounter to build their resilience. We parents may also need to scaffold better socially those children who have OEs that are "off the charts," managing their exposure to stressful or toxic situations or people and refrain from gaslighting them at the holidays.

 

hopAmy

Overexcitabilities and Asynchronicity and Perfectionism! Oh, My! ~Gifted Unschooling (Amy Harrington)

Some of the most overwhelming aspects of raising gifted children are all the quirks, idiosyncrasies and discrepancies in abilities. Without a thorough understanding of what overexcitabilities are and how they impact a child's experience in the world, parents and others close to the child may contemplate attaching a pathological disorder to try and explain away the difficult behaviors and outbursts that unfold in daily life. To contemplate matters more, asynchronicity creates a layer of confusion when a child whose physical age, intellectual age and social-emotional age conflict with his chronological age concurrently and in any given moment. But, let's not stop there kindred spirits. Until we sprinkle in a heavy dose of perfectionism, we haven't even touched the surface of how complicated living with gifted children can be.

 

nopNikkiParenting and OEs: Is Sensitivity Your Child's Super Power? ~ Through a Stronger Lens (Nicole Linn)

On a regular basis, the members of the family alternate between high levels of emotion, the need to move, and a desire to learn and do everything as often as possible. We each have various levels of sensory comfort and discomfort, and there is no shortage of imagination. It can make life interesting.

 

hopCareParenting Reality in the Land of Willful Ignorance ~ Homeschooling Hatters (Care Martin)

Every so often we run into folks who just don't get what life is like at our house. They have an image of what a "gifted child" is in their head, and when our life doesn't match that image, obviously it is because none of us are gifted. I wish, fairly frequently, that our lives matched that image, but they just don't. However, the fact that we aren't all bookworms who enjoy studying, who raise their hands first, or who don't have parties, but instead have Socratic Conversations over weekends, while engaged in high-profile careers which allow us to have a housekeeper, and incredibly flexible hours so we're mostly paid to just think... Well, people seem to not realize that no, that's not what gifted (much less 2E!) is. At least, not by and large.

 

hopPaulaRaising a Kid Who's Just Like You ~ Your Rainforest Mind (Paula Prober)

What do you do when you're excruciatingly sensitive, severely intense, outrageously curious, and wildly imaginative and you're raising a kid who is JUST LIKE YOU? Do you-- run away from home? Move to a state where marijuana is legal? Outsource your child to India? Create a reality TV show?


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Past Blog Hops

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