Painting Like the Greats: Art Gallery

By Lisa Lauffer
GHFO Art Instructor

Will, 11, Raphael's unione technique

Will, 11, Raphael's unione technique

Ben, 10, da Vinci's sfumato technique

Ben, 10, da Vinci's sfumato technique

Greetings from the Painting Like the Greats class! As of this week, we are halfway through the semester. We began with a whirlwind tour of the art periods, from that of the cave dwellers to the art movements of today. After acquainting ourselves with the overall flow of art throughout history, we started studying individual artists, their lives, and their art, with the purpose of experimenting with their techniques in our own art. Throughout this blog post you'll see some of the artwork the students have produced.

 

Hannah, 10, da Vinci's sfumato technique

Hannah, 10, da Vinci's sfumato technique

As we explored each artist, we learned a little about his life, including, in appropriate cases, his giftedness. Think of the multipotentiality of daVinci, who was not only an artist but also a scientist, inventor, engineer, musician, and writer, among even more talents. Or consider Michelangelo, who wasn't much interested in school, but was a perfectionist who studied cadavers so he could paint human musculature just right.

Emily, 16, Raphael's unione technique

Emily, 16, Raphael's unione technique

 

After learning about each artist's life, we've delved into the technique for which he is best known. We've spent most of our time exploring the shading techniques of three Renaissance artists: da Vinci's sfumato (smoky) technique, Raphael's unione technique, and Michelangelo's cangiante technique. We've also wandered into the Baroque art period to explore Caravaggio's chiaroscuro shading.

 

Maegen, 10, Michelangelo's cangiante technique

Maegen, 11, Michelangelo's cangiante technique

Next stop, Impressionism, where we'll explore how Impressionists such as Manet and Monet used color and broad painting strokes to break the rules of their contemporaries' artistic conventions. Not only did these artists challenge what was considered art, in the face of rejection by the Académie of Beaux-Arts, a governing body that determined which art pieces were shown at the Salon exhibition, they developed their own means for sharing their paintings with the world. How's that for inspiration for gifted kids?

 

 

Wondering how we teach art online? Read here.

Lisa will be teaching Building Blocks of Art for GHF Online in Spring 2016.  

Registration opens the first week of November!

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